Dáil Debates, Human Rights, International, Topical Questions

The Forgetting

Apr
2018
10

Features

The minute I’m appointed Minister

for Justice, Broadcasting, and Espionage,

I’ll send forth a decree

making it criminal, and punishable

by being made sit forever

on a bus that never leaves

Kinnegad, to make any further mention of

Miriam O’Callaghan.

It will be an offence

to download any part of Miriam O’Callaghan

from the internet.

Furthermore, any computers or

smart-phones found to contain pictures

of Miriam O’Callaghan

will be broken up

by care-in-the-community

lunatics with specially made

hammers my Department will

provide them with.

The Armed Response Unit will begin

raiding houses known to contain back issues

of the RTE Guide disfigured

with her image.

 

It will be a crime even

for you to read this poem,

or, technically, for me to have written it.

If reading this poem in the printed version

be sure and eat the paper it’s written on

and that all of it has passed successfully

through your digestive system

bcfore you’re arrested.

 

KEVIN HIGGINS

Local Issues

Dean Mulligan and Clare Daly TD have launched a report on the findings of a local survey on attitudes on bin charges and privatised waste collection. (see Link below) At the launch deputy Daly said:

‘With the introduction of recent bin charge hikes to cover recycling costs the wheel has come full circle on the bin tax issue. Fifteen years ago communities across north county Dublin campaigned against the introduction of bin charges, warning they would lead to privatization of the service & price increases. This was denied, we were told it was a measure to encourage recycling, that ‘you only pay for what you throw away’, as if residents were the producers of waste. If this was about recycling they would have tackled the packaging companies and the real producers of waste’, Clare Daly said.

She continued, ‘With the new recycling charges, bins are being rejected for the slightest contamination in recycling bins with extra charges and bins being left behind. Already this has led to a sharp rise in items going into black bins and reports of even worse than usual illegal dumping in our rural communities.

The report commissioned by my office, with the survey conducted by Dean Mulligan is incredibly timely. There is a massive desire for the re-municipalisation of the service with 91.1% of residents supporting it & deep discontent with the present situation. We look forward to bringing the information back to the community & actively developing an alternative co-operative service .’

Dean Mulligan said, ‘conducting the survey was an incredible experience. We spoke to 930 households in Rivervalley and the anger was enormous. The report presents our findings. It puts the issue squarely in the context of privatization & the history of waste collection in Ireland over the past number of years. In terms of recycling only 35.7% believe they get adequate advice and information on recycling with almost 2/3 believing that they don’t. There is a total lack of awareness of the impact of the legislation.

The key finding we will be moving on is the fact that 98.5% of residents expressed interest in a local not for profit co-operative waste collection service. I will be going back on the doorsteps with the survey and working with Trademark who prepared the report for us to make this a reality, and convening a follow on meeting in the coming weeks.’

The survey is available at the link below.

CD IND TD BIN SURVEY MASTER DOC 200301 MAR 2018 LOW RES

Education, Parliamentary Questions

To ask the Minister for Education and Skills if he is satisfied that the primary school needs of children in the River Valley, Ridgewood and Boroimhe areas of Swords can be met in 2017 and 2018; and if he will make a statement on the matter.

REPLY

Prior to the conclusion of the enrolment process in the school planning area referred to by the Deputy, representations were made to my Department indicated that there was a shortage of junior infant places for September 2017.  At that time my Department, based on demographic information available, projected that 760 junior infant places were required and that the 11 schools enrolling junior infants in the area could facilitate this level of intake.  While waiting lists for individual schools seemed to indicate a greater demand than that projected it was understood by my Department that these lists reflected inclusion of pupils on more than one waiting list and also included applications from parents in respect of enrolments in later years, e.g. 2018/19 etc.

I can confirm to the Deputy that the junior infant enrolment in September 2017, in the school planning area referred to was 737.   
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