Dáil Questions: Military Exports

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To ask the Tánaiste and Minister for Jobs; Enterprise and Innovation her views on the year on year increase in the value of military exports between 2015 and 2016, from €42 million to €63 million; and if she will make a statement on the matter.

REPLY.
I publish an annual report under the Control of Exports Act 2008 which includes information on military exports. The objective of publishing such a report is to provide the public with a continuing enhanced level of transparency about exports of controlled goods and services. Export controls are of particular importance to my Department in ensuring compliance with the highest international standards in accordance with international law. Our policy of free trade and open markets must conform with the core principles of security, regional stability and human rights which underpin export controls. 

In 2015, 81 military licences were issued for exports to 16 countries.  In 2016, 128 military licences were issued for exports to 20 countries.  The increase in the value of licensed military exports between 2015 and 2016 is due mainly to increases in exports to Germany, USA and Singapore.

The EU has a range of sanctions in place in respect of countries engaged in conflicts. All licence applications are considered having regard to these measures.  Sanctions can include arms embargoes and various restrictive measures including prohibitions on the provision of targeted goods and services. My Department observes all arms embargos and trade sanctions when considering export licence applications.

All export licence applications, whether for Dual-Use or Military Goods are subject to rigorous scrutiny.  My officials seek observations on any foreign policy concerns that may arise in respect of a proposed export; such factors are subject to review in the light of developments in a given region and having regard to the 2008 EU Common Position on Arms Exports. Any observations which may arise from this examination are considered in the final assessment of any licence application.

My Department may refuse an export licence, following consultation with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and other EU and Non-EU export licensing authorities, as appropriate.

The Control of Exports Act 2008 provides the legal basis for export controls, the licensing regime and the overall regulatory environment relating to the export of dual-use and military goods.

QUESTION NO: 39
DÁIL QUESTION addressed to the Tánaiste and Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Frances Fitzgerald)
by Deputy Clare Daly
for ORAL ANSWER on 29/06/2017
To ask the Tánaiste and Minister for Jobs; Enterprise and Innovation the number of licences for the export of military goods to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait, Egypt, Morocco and Jordan issued by her department in 2016; and the value of licences issued for each country.

REPLY.
In 2016, my Department issued one military export licence with a value of €202,000 where the United Arab Emirates was the ultimate destination and six military export licences with a value of €742,429 where Saudi Arabia was the ultimate destination. This was in respect of category ML5 Military products, which includes electronic control devices and components. No licence applications arose in respect of the other countries raised by the Deputy.
The EU has a range of sanctions in place in respect of countries engaged in conflicts. All licence applications are considered having regard to these measures. Sanctions can include arms embargoes and various restrictive measures including prohibitions on the provision of targeted goods and services. My Department observes all arms embargos and trade sanctions when considering export licence applications.
All export licence applications, whether for Dual-Use or Military Goods are subject to rigorous scrutiny. My officials seek observations from the Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade on any foreign policy concerns that may arise in respect of a proposed export; such factors are subject to review in the light of developments in a given region and having regard to the 2008 EU Common Position on Arms Exports. Any observations which may arise from this examination are considered in the final assessment of any licence application.
My Department may refuse an export licence, following consultation with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and other EU and Non-EU export licensing authorities, as appropriate.