Economy

Archive for the ‘Economy’ Category

Economy, Oral Questions

Clare asked the Minister for Finance about the cost to the tax payer over the recent debacle regarding letters erroneously sent out for payment of property tax.  Click on the link below to watch the discussion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzbL2WJ4Nws&feature=youtu.be

Economy

By Jacob Richards

Over the last few days the government has been quick to highlight the impending conclusion of Ireland’s bailout package as a clear sign of economic recovery. The media have eagerly jumped on the bandwagon with claims that the final bailout review visit by the troika is a “historic day.” Such headlines fit the general narrative of neo-liberalism whereby once, we as a sovereign nation can return to the financial markets, everything will be just fine and dandy again. The reality is that this is just opportunistic spin and drivel by our government and media who are quite content to sing the same tune. 
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Dáil Debates, Economy, National

Speaking on the Social welfare and Pensions Bill 2013 Clare accuses Government Ministers of glossing over the high emigration figures and demonizing the unemployed.  There is no evidence to suggest that social welfare cuts will create jobs on the contrary it will lead to further emigration.  Click on the link below to watch Clare’s contribution to the debate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAFT4PocbHU&feature=youtu.be

Economy, Features, National

By Jacob Richards

Labour may like to suggest they have the interests of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged members of society at heart but in reality it appears their policies are more akin to something we would see put forward by the British Conservative Party. In fact much of Labour’s accompanying rhetoric suggests the party is quite content to embrace Tory values.

Let us consider the measures introduced in last weeks’ budget and targeted at young people under the age of 26. In the case of Jobseekers between the age of 22 and 26 the government introduced a flat cut of €44. This means that for those aged between 18 and 24 jobseekers payments will now amount to just €100 a week while those aged 25 will now receive €144. These cuts are cruel and unnecessary in themselves but worse still, they have been accompanied by the most condescending and arrogant rhetoric of government ministers towards young people. Labour in particular have been exceptionally bad offenders. During Leaders Questions last week, the Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore proclaimed, “the best place for any young person is not permanently in front of a flat screen television. It is at work or in education and training.”
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